60 Days Since Ida, Louisiana Recovery Continues to be Whole Community Effort

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It’s been 60 days since Hurricane Ida made landfall. The first months of disaster recovery are often intense, stressful, and sometimes chaotic. That has not slowed down the effort to assist those affected by Ida. Efforts to rebuild and come back from such devastation come from the whole community; one agency cannot do it alone. Through the utilization of state and local resources, volunteer agencies, as well as federal partners, Louisianians have been able to continue to return to some form of normalcy.

 

Houma, LA.- Mother and son at a Disaster Recovery Center, where survivors affected by Hurricane Ida can get help with their disaster assistance applications, upload documents and get questions answered. Representatives from the U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) are also on hand to provide program information and explain how to apply for SBA’s low-interest disaster loans for businesses, private nonprofits, homeowners, and renters. Photo by Julie Joseph, FEMA.

 

 

Montegut, LA – Members of a FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance crew walk door to door (or boat to boat) to help residents apply for assistance after Hurricane Ida. Photo by Julie Joseph, FEMA.

 

Thibodaux, LA — FEMA mitigation specialists give tips to Hurricane Ida survivors on how to rebuild and protect their homes from future disaster-related damage. Photo by Julie Joseph, FEMA.

Houma, LA – Members of a FEMA Disaster Survivor Assistance crew walk door to door to help residents of Houma apply for assistance after Hurricane Ida. Photo by Julie Joseph, FEMA.

 

For the latest information visit fema.gov/disaster/4611. Follow the FEMA Region 6 Twitter account at twitter.com/FEMARegion6 or on Facebook at facebook.com/FEMARegion6/.