Drew Brees

Drew Brees returns to practice this week and all indications are that he will make every effort to be on the field on Sunday when the New Orleans Saints host the Arizona Cardinals.

That’s a no-brainer.

We all love Teddy Bridgewater an all — and the work he’s done this season in relief of Brees has been nothing short of admirable. But one would be a fool to debate that Teddy and not Drew gives the Saints the best chance to win the Super Bowl this season.

I think we all agree there.

But what about in 2020?

See, I got to thinking last night, and I think the Saints are going to have some extremely difficult decisions to make this offseason.

Both Brees and Bridgewater are free agents after this season, meaning both men are going to be able to negotiate with every team in the league.

In a perfect world, the Saints would just keep both, but with every touchdown pass Bridgewater throws, that’s becoming more and more unlikely.

Last offseason, Bridgewater opted to remain with the Saints after getting interest from the Miami Dolphins. He said he preferred to continue to learn under Brees for another year and he was patient about getting the right opportunity.

But the Dolphins’ situation is a mess. They’re unquestionably the worst team in the NFL this season. This offseason, Bridgewater will have more offers from more attractive landing spots, and while he may prefer to be Brees’ successor, he’s also a competitor and will want to play if the situation is right and the price works, as well.

So that brings us to Brees.

I don’t think the Saints would ever let Brees go to another team. That would be NFL blasphemy. But the Saints have a youthful roster that’s now proven capable of winning games with Bridgewater under center.

So is it REALLY worth losing possibly 6-8 years of Bridgewater for 1-2 more years of Brees?

If so, who would then be Brees’ successor should he retire in 2020 or 2021?

It’s not an easy decision to make.

The last thing New Orleans would want is to lose Bridgewater to another team, have him flourish, then struggle to find another quarterback for years after Brees’ retirement.

The NFL is a quarterback-driven league, and without one, you’re doomed. Just ask yesterday’s opponent, the Chicago Bears. Their defense is excellent, but they have no real chance to win the Super Bowl. Why? Because their quarterback stinks to high heavens.

In a perfect world, the Saints would win the Super Bowl this year, Brees would retire, and the team would have a natural, seamless transition from one signal caller to the next.

But this is professional sports, and history shows us that these types of things often don’t go the way the storybook says they should.

So what say you?

If unable to keep both this offseason, who do you think the Saints should lock up? Brees in the short-term or Teddy in the long-term?

Earlier this season, I’d have said Brees and I’d have not batted an eye. But after watching Teddy beat the Seahawks, Cowboys and Bears, I’m now thinking that a less expensive game manager may be better, because the team will be able to pay all of its young stars and keep its core in tact.

As a Saints fan, what would you prefer?

Teddy Bridgewater's recent play has raised questions about the team's quarterback position going forward.

You voted:

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Casey Gisclair is the Sports Editor at Rushing Media. A native of Cut Off and graduate of Louisiana State University, Casey is a lifelong sports fan who joined the Houma Times team in Dec. 2009 upon college graduation.

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